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Standard Auto Policy Online Car Insurance Quotes and policy details. The more that you understand the more you save!

The contents of your Standard Personal Car Insurance Policy

An Auto Insurance - Car Insurance policy is a binding legal contract.

Your personal auto policy will have five distinct parts:

  • declarations  • insuring agreement  • definitions  • conditions  • exclusions

 

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In most personal automobile insurance policy documents, some of these parts will be combined. But they'll all be there. Here's what each section means to you, the insured/s:  Standard Auto Policy and your Credit

Declarations

This section will most likely be the first thing in your auto insurance policy, and it's almost always its own section, it will have been prepared especially for you and all that are insured on the policy.

The declarations lists all relevant information about your personal automobile policy. This includes:

  • the year, make, and model of your automobile/s
  • its VIN (vehicle identification number)
  • the name of the insured (you an all others as named insured's)
  • the dates the policy is effective
  • the policy's coverage types and limits
  • the policy's cost (your premium)


Sometimes other information is included (like whether you use the vehicle for business or for pleasure). And if your car is financed, the lender who holds the lien on the vehicle will be listed here as the "loss payee". (If the car is "totaled", they'll need to be reimbursed.)

 
          Insuring Agreement

This section is the legal piece of the personal auto insurance policy. It outlines exactly what the insurance company will pay in return for the payment of your premium.

The type and extent of each coverage you've purchased will be described in detail here. This section will also outline exactly who is covered under each provision. It's a long and complicated section, but it's probably the most important part of your auto insurance policy.

Definitions

Want to guess what this section's all about? . All  insurance lingo will be clarified here.

Sometimes this section is simply written into the insuring agreement. But in either case, you can be sure that every relevant term will be narrowly defined, so as to cut down on the possibility of a misunderstanding between the you, other insured's  and the insurance company.

 
          Exclusions

This is an important section, because it lets you know what, when and who will not be covered by your policy. The insurance policy exclusions section is really just a list of all possible circumstances that would free the insurer from the responsibility of paying a claim.

An example: most car insurance policies contain an exclusion that exempts the insurer from paying in the case of intentionally caused damage or injury. (Possible Insurance Fraud investigation may follow) Take time to read the exclusions, because you don't want to be caught relying on some kind of coverage that you don't actually have.

Conditions

This will become a very important section should you ever be involved in an accident. It lists your duties and responsibilities as the insured in the event of a claim situation.

This part of an auto insurance policy usually includes guidelines for contacting the insurance company, obtaining a police report, and filing a claim. Information on auto insurance policy cancellation will be outlined here, too.

Collision Insurance

Collision insurance coverage pays for damage caused to your vehicle in an automobile accident, when you are "at fault". A standard collision car insurance policy will pay for any repairs up to the fair market value of your car.

It is important to remember that this value can be significantly lower than the cost of replacing your vehicle (or your loan balance.) If your car is financed or leased, you will need coverage's to cover what you owe and what the car is worth.

Collision coverage usually also comes with an insurance deductible. It's the amount of out of pocket money you pay toward repairs before your collision insurance pays. The higher the deductible you're willing to pay, the less the collision policy will cost.

Collision insurance coverage is not required by law in any state. However, if you're driving a car purchased from a dealership or financed through a lender, you may be required by the dealership or lender to carry collision insurance.

 
Comprehensive Automobile Insurance
Comprehensive is very similar to collision insurance, the main difference being that comprehensive covers damage caused to your vehicle caused by any unknown party or "act of God".

Vandalism, flood, hurricane, theft, and fire are all events usually covered by comprehensive car insurance. (But make sure to read your comprehensive insurance policy for exact coverage details.)

Like collision car insurance, comprehensive coverage will pay up to the fair market value of your car (less your insurance deductible.) And although it's not legally required by any state law, you will probably need it if your car is financed or leased.

Automobile Insurance Endorsements

Automobile insurance endorsement is just a fancy term for any of those policy extras like towing insurance, auto glass insurance, daily rental insurance, and emergency roadside insurance.

These policies are never required by any state law, but many drivers value the security and convenience they provide.

Here's what you get to chose from  the endorsement menu:

  • auto towing insurance pays for  towing your car anytime you need it

  • auto glass insurance gives you a lower deductible (or no deductible) when it comes to repairing any broken window on your car.

  • daily rental insurance covers the cost of a rental car while your car is being repaired because of a covered event. (So you'll usually need both comprehensive and collision insurance to qualify.)

  • emergency roadside assistance covers repairs done on the spot. Changing a flat roadside may be covered, but you'll have to pay for any repairs at the garage. This policy is often combined with auto towing coverage, and called roadside emergency towing insurance.

In some states, medical payments coverage and uninsured/ underinsured motorists coverage's are voluntary coverage's. In others, they're mandatory.

 

Required coverage types

Minimum liability limits

No fault?

Alabama

bodily injury and property damage liability

20/40/10

no

Alaska

bodily injury and property damage liability

50/100/25

no

Arizona

bodily injury and property damage liability

15/30/10

no

Arkansas

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/25

no

California

bodily injury and property damage liability

15/30/5

no

Colorado

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/15

no

Connecticut

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist

20/40/10

no

Delaware

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection

15/30/10

no

DC

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist

25/50/10

yes

Florida

property damage liability, personal injury protection

10/20/10

yes

Georgia

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/25

no

Hawaii

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection

20/40/10

yes

Idaho

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/15

no

Illinois

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist

20/40/15

no

Indiana

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/10

no

Iowa

bodily injury and property damage liability

20/40/15

no

Kansas

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection

25/50/10

yes

Kentucky

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection

25/50/10

yes

Louisiana

bodily injury and property damage liability

10/20/10

no

Maine

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist

50/100/25

no

Maryland

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured and underinsured motorist

20/40/15

no

Massachusetts

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection, uninsured motorist

20/40/5

yes

Michigan

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection

20/40/10

yes

Minnesota

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection, uninsured and underinsured motorist

30/60/10

yes

Mississippi

bodily injury and property damage liability

10/20/5

no

Missouri

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist

25/50/10

no

Montana

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/10

no

Nebraska

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured and underinsured motorist

25/50/25

no

Nevada

bodily injury and property damage liability

15/30/10

no

New Hampshire

proof of financial responsibility, medical payments, uninsured motorist

25/50/25

no

New Jersey

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection, uninsured motorist

15/30/5

yes

New Mexico

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/10

no

New York

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist, personal injury protection

25/50/10

yes

North Carolina

bodily injury and property damage liability

30/60/25

no

North Dakota

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection, uninsured and underinsured motorist

25/50/25

yes

Ohio

bodily injury and property damage liability

12.5/25/7.5

no

Oklahoma

bodily injury and property damage liability

10/20/10

no

Oregon

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection, uninsured and underinsured motorist

25/50/10

no

Pennsylvania

bodily injury and property damage liability, medical payments

15/30/5

yes

Rhode Island

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/25

no

South Carolina

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist

15/30/10

no

South Dakota

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist

25/50/25

no

Tennessee

proof of financial responsibility

25/50/10

no

Texas

bodily injury and property damage liability

20/40/15

no

Utah

bodily injury and property damage liability, personal injury protection, uninsured and underinsured motorist

25/50/15

yes

Vermont

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist

25/50/10

no

Virginia

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured and underinsured motorist

25/50/20

no

Washington

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/10

no

West Virginia

bodily injury and property damage liability, uninsured motorist

20/40/10

no

Wisconsin

proof of financial responsibility, uninsured motorist

25/50/10

no

Wyoming

bodily injury and property damage liability

25/50/20

no

This list may be updated or changed at any time and is for general informational purposes only.
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